Free ny public death records


U.S. Vital Records Online - State by State Listing

New York State Deaths and Burials Flower Memorial Library, Washington St. River Rd. Cemetery records and census reports. Deeds, assessment records, and manuscripts. Maps from the 's showing property owners. Oneida St. No information shall be issued from a record of birth unless a record has been on file for at least 75 years or more and the person who the record relates is known to the applicant to be deceased.

No information shall be issued from a record of birth that has been placed in a confidential file. No information may be issued for a record of death unless the record has been on file for at least 50 years or more.

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Vital records were mandatory in but not enforced until Literacy Services. Phone: Online Form. To visit their webpage, click below: ncls. Please try a different search, perhaps one with fewer parameters. The records of the death index for , , and are currently only available in digital image format.

Luckily, they're easy to use and completely free. In , the non-profit organization Reclaim The Records obtained microfilm copies of the data for these years from the New Jersey State Archives in Trenton, and the non-profit organization FamilySearch donated the microfilm digitization equipment and labor, thereby creating the first-ever digital copies. The information provided by these early years of the death index is very basic. However, is the only year of the index that provides information as to the race of the deceased person , denoting every African-American with the notation " B " for "Black".

No other racial categories are noted and no other years of the state index do this. The images for these years are now being sought from the reference microfilm copies at the New Jersey State Archives in Trenton. If they can be located, microfilm copies will be acquired, then digitized, and then put online for free public use, possibly by the end of The death index for the 's is unusual in that the records are grouped in five-year periods, and Within each grouping, they are then separated out by locality name, such as county or major city.

Within each locality, they are broken down by year, as represented by the single final digit of the year, such as "4" for And finally, within each of those years inside each of those localities, the records are then listed alphabetically by surname. Note that half of the index is missing , as the New Jersey Department of Health could not locate their own copy of the information. A copy of the missing document is being sought from the reference microfilms at the New Jersey State Archives and if found, will be digitized and put online, probably by the end of It seems unlikely that even the New Jersey State Archives has a copy of the index for these years.

However, they do have reference microfilms of the actual death certificates for these years.


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In late , Reclaim The Records will be exploring legal options to see if there is any way to force the state to re-create this missing index data. These years of the death index supply only basic information, including the month and year of death, but not the exact day.

They also provide numeric locality codes for the place of death and place of residence. Use this locality code master key used by the state between to translate that code into a named location.

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Genealogy Resources

Starting in , the state death index starts to provide the exact date of death, not just the month and year. Place of death and place of residence are still provided as numeric locality codes, so you'll still need to reference the state's locality key for These numbers cannot ever be legally reused once a person is deceased, so yes, it is perfectly fine to list them.

The place of death and place of residence are still provided as numeric locality codes, so you'll still need to reference the state's locality key for Starting in , the state death index stops using those annoying numeric locality codes for the place of death and place of residence. From this point on, the first four letters of the county and the first five letters of the town or city are explicitly spelled out.

Another helpful change: starting in , the deceased person's exact date of birth is provided, where known. Also, the age at death will now state whether the number refers to age in years, age in months, or age in days. In , the state death index starts to spell out many more characters of the county name and the town or city name for both the place of death and the place of residence, not just the first few characters.

Birth, Marriage, and Death Records | New York State Archives

This record set is only the index to New Jersey death records. If you find a name of a relative or other person of interest in this index, you can then place an order for a copy of the original death certificate, which will have much more information on it, such as the person's place of birth, the names of the person's parents and spouse, and their burial location. She had been the person behind the lack of transparency on pricing, the ten-day exploding offer, the months of delays, and all of that. And as we were approaching the legal deadline of whether or not to pursue legal action against the state, we heard through the grapevine that this woman was suddenly no longer the Records Access Officer.

In any case, she was now gone. This meant that instead of suing the state, we could try a different tactic. Luckily, this new one was far more pleasant to deal with, and as far as we could see she did not do anything overtly illegal.

Person Died Outside of New York City

At this point, it was nearing the end of In an effort to move things along, we asked the new Records Access Officer if we could bring in our own digitization vendor to do the scanning of the microfiche sheets they held, just to make it easier on the state and get these records copied already.

She replied that we could indeed hire our own vendor to do the scanning…with a few minor restrictions. And so on. Frustrated but persistent, we said yes to all these demands. But can we just have the death index already?


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  2. Payment of Fees;
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  4. Well, no. And that meant that we also had to wait while they discussed and approved the government funding to hire this archivist. So while we waited, we tried yet another tack to speed up this request, which was by now more than a year old. Hey, remember how there are about eleven libraries in New York State where the public can use a copy of this microfiche? Can we maybe scan one of those copies instead of waiting for you guys in Albany to get an archivist to assess your copies?

    They claimed that the libraries are under the Department of Education, and to get access to their holdings, including these death index microfiche, we would have to file a FOIL request with the Department of Education instead of the Department of Health. And then?

    Another bombshell dropped — but this time, a good one, or so it seemed, The Records Access Officer, on one of our many phone calls to her asking for a status update, suddenly let us know that the Department would be hiring a vendor to scan the vault copies. But now it was all going to be handed to us for free? And a few months later, seventeen months after the original FOIL request had been filed, we finally received in the mail a small USB hard drive containing all the seventy-six years of scanned microfiche.

    Several months later, we found out why Reclaim The Records had never received a bill, or even an estimate, from the state itself or from the mysterious vendor who had scanned the microfiche sheets on behalf on the state. The vendor turned out to be none other than Ancestry. They, along with every other genealogy organization in the world, as well as those from many other industries like insurance companies, had been hammering on New York State for years, for decades, begging for copies of the incredibly valuable data of this statewide death index.

    And at that point, Ancestry apparently felt threatened and did not want to be cut out of the records pipeline entirely. Even though Reclaim The Records always has and always will post all our data online for free, whether images or text, clearly in the public domain, it seems like Ancestry wanted to make sure they still were a player in the game with unique access to the state.

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    This meant that they had a head start on scanning and perhaps even indexing this brand new data and preparing it for upload to their website, while we at Reclaim The Records, the original FOIL requestor, waited ignorantly and patiently for our own copy to arrive in the mail. They presented it entirely as their own achievement. Ancestry never mentioned that Reclaim The Records had initiated the FOIL request, had fought the state and their underhanded tactics for over a year, had paid our own attorneys for for legal help.

    And in their publication of the new database, including their press releases and blog posts and even a specially-made video introduction they filmed for social media, they never once mentioned a single word about Reclaim The Records, or our work, or gave a link to our website. Ancestry will, however, make quite a bit of money off these millions of valuable New York records being posted behind their paywall, an especially important concern as news reports indicate that the company was until recently moving towards an IPO.

    We did it for the love of open public records access. Was all this legal? But was it right to cut all of our work and initiative out of the story? Was it ethical, or even just plain nice? Meanwhile, Reclaim The Records took our hard-won copies of the statewide death index and returned our copies to the public domain, totally free, just as planned.

    County Public Records

    Eventually there will be free copies of a text database of the New York State death index, not behind paywalls, for everyone to use.

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